Tag Archives: shot

CONDUCTOR RECOVERS FROM GUNSHOT WOUNDS

On May 16, 2017, Michael Case was working as a conductor on an Amtrak train pulling into the station in Naperville, Illinois. Aboard the train was Edward Klein, 79, who was returning home from a canceled trip to Las Vegas..

Case knew that Klein needed to get to Chicago to catch a train to Milwaukee to get to his home in West Allis, Wisconsin. He was aware of a plan to escort Klein at Union Station to get him safely home to Wisconsin.

When the train pulled into the station in Naperville, Case got off the train to help other riders with their baggage. Klein was acting agitated and disoriented so Case closed and locked the train doors to keep Klein on the train. Case later explained his decision to keep Klein on the train, “I didn’t feel like it was a safe place for him to get off at Naperville station with all those tracks there.”

Minutes later, Klein reached out an open window and shot Case with a .38 caliber revolver. Case, who was struck in the abdomen, was able to crawl behind a partition to safety. He was taken to Edward Hospital in Naperville in critical condition and underwent multiple surgeries during the next six weeks. He was released from the hospital ten weeks after the shooting.

During his hospitalization, Case’s wife stayed at the hospital almost twenty-four hours a day. She was his support, his anchor, through it all. Case said, “I remember her sorting me out real quick, like, ‘Hey, we’re going to do this. I got you.’ And she did.”

Klein was charged with attempted first-degree murder, and was ordered held on $1.5 million bail. His attorney said that Klein was mentally unfit to stand trial.

According to https://www.dailyherald.com/news/20180105/dupage-judge-wisconsin-man-had-intent-to-kill-amtrak-conductor, “A DuPage County judge ruled Friday that Edward Klein knew he was doing wrong and intended to kill an Amtrak conductor he shot last May in Naperville. Using a complicated legal term, Judge Jeffrey MacKay ruled Klein was “not not guilty” and “not acquitted” of the multiple charges against him, despite being found unfit to stand trial. Doctors have diagnosed Klein with an impaired cognitive disorder and dementia and said he suffers from a major neuro-cognitive disorder.” He faces confinement in a mental health facility.

If you have a family member who has suffered a serious injury and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

RECOVERING FROM A SERIOUS INJURY

It was a typical Saturday on the Amtrak train heading from Kansas City to Chicago. Michael Case, 46, of Homewood was the conductor. The date was May 19, 2017.

One older male passenger seemed “discombobulated,” Case later reported. The passenger, Edward Klein, had tried to enter private sleeping quarters and asked where he could find the library.

When the train made a scheduled stop at the Fourth Avenue Metra Railway station north of downtown Naperville, Case said he tried to help Klein by keeping him from getting off. He knew that Klein was bound for Milwaukee via Chicago. The conductor said he then got off the train and unloaded some baggage.

When Case returned to the train compartment door, he said he saw Klein standing inside, holding a snub-nosed revolver and wearing “a look of anger.” Klein, a retired federal law enforcement officer, fired once, striking Case in the torso.

The Chicago Tribune article “Train conductor shot at Naperville station” describes how Case turned and ran a short distance. Onlookers “wrestled Klein to the ground and kept him immobile until police arrived. Naperville police officer Anthony Cimilucca, who took Klein into custody and recovered the revolver from his pants pocket, testified that Klein said he was angry because he was prevented from leaving the train.”

The Chicago Tribune article reported that a hearing was scheduled “to determine whether to acquit Klein or find that prosecutors have sufficient evidence to prove his guilt.” Klein could face involuntary commitment in a mental facility. Because of his mental state, Klein would not face a prison sentence.

Klein, who is eighty years old, has since been declared unfit to stand trial on charges that include attempted murder. Authorities say that Klein “exhibits dementialike symptoms and is not likely to regain mental fitness.”

Case was hospitalized for two months and had a third surgery planned for January. David Piazza, the medical director for trauma surgery at Edward Hospital, has said that “Michael Case is in serious condition, and expected to require hospitalization and treatment for another six to nine months.” According to his wife, Sara, Michael Case remains anxious to get back on the job at Amtrak. “Our goal on the medical staff is (that) he will return to work,” Piazza said.

When an individual is recovering from a serious injury, he may be able to return home with round-the-clock private duty nursing. American Home Health offers private duty nursing for adults in Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission.

For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—by Karen Centowski