Tag Archives: IL

HEMOPHILIA: “A ROYAL DISEASE”

HEMOPHILIA is a rare blood disorder in which the patient’s blood does not clot normally because it lacks sufficient blood-clotting factors. An inherited disease, it is usually passed from mother to son. Because it was prevalent in European royal families, it is also known as “a royal disease.”

According to https://hemophilianewstoday.com/2017/05/24, it is believed that Victoria, Queen of England, was a carrier of hemophilia and that she passed the disease onto three of her children. Prince Leopold died at age 30 from a post-accident hemorrhage. Princess Alice and Princess Beatrice married royalty in other European countries.

Princess Alice, a hemophilia carrier, had a son who died from the disease in early childhood. One of her daughters, Irene, married Prince Henry of Prussia. She passed the gene to the German royal family. Alice had two sons, one of whom died at age 4. The other son died at age 56.

Alice’s second daughter, Alix, married Tsar Nikolas II of the Russian royal family. Tragically, all of their children were killed during the Russian revolution. The mutant gene ended there.

Princess Beatrice’s daughter, Victoria Eugenie, married King Alfonso XII of Spain. They had five children—one daughter and four sons. The daughter was a carrier of the hemophilia gene, but her children did not inherit the disease. Two of the four sons had hemophilia, but they died without having children.

It is interesting to note how the mutant gene, hemophilia, affected history. Today, hemophilia has affected people from all walks of life including actors, sports legends, and ordinary people. Richard Burton, the British actor and husband of Elizbeth Taylor, had hemophilia. In 1964, he and Elizabeth Taylor set up the Richard Burton Hemophilia Fund. He died in 1984 from a stroke at the age of 58.

Cyclist Barry Haarde is a hemophilia advocate who has cycled across the United States twice to raise awareness for the disease. He was infected with HIV and hepatitis C during a blood transfusion more than thirty years ago. He is the only man with HIV, hepatitis C, and hemophilia to have cycled across the country.

Ryan White was diagnosed with severe hemophilia A at three days old following extensive bleeding after his circumcision. During the 1980’s he contracted AIDS from unscreened blood transfusions, and he inadvertently became the poster boy for AIDS.

If you have a family member who suffers from hemophilia and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

EISENHOWER’S BATTLE WITH CROHN’S DISEASE

Born October 14, 1890 in Denison, Texas, Dwight David Eisenhower was raised in Kansas.  He graduated from West Point in 1915 and began his military career.

During World War II, he was a five-star general in the United States Army and served as supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces in Europe.  According to Wikipedia, he was responsible for planning and supervising the invasion of North Africa in Operation Torch in 1942-1943 and the successful invasion of France and Germany in 1944-1945 from the Western Front.

In 1953 at the age of sixty-two, Eisenhower was elected the 34th President of the United States.  On May 10, 1956, six months before being re-elected for a second term, he was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease.

What is Crohn’s disease?  According to the Mayo Clinic article “Crohn’s Disease—Symptoms and Causes” at https://www.mayoclinic.orgdiseases-conditions/crohns-disease. It is an inflammatory bowel disease which causes inflammation of the digestive tract.  It can lead to abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, and malnutrition.  Symptoms can range from mild to severe.

The exact cause of Crohn’s disease is unknown.  According to the Mayo Clinic article, risk factors for Crohn’s disease may include the following:

  • Age.  Crohn’s disease can occur at any age, but most people are diagnosed before they are thirty years old.
  • Ethnicity. Crohn’s disease can affect any ethnic group, but whites and people of Eastern European (Ashkenazi) Jewish descent have the highest risk.
  • Family history. If you have a close relative with the disease, such as a parent, sibling, or child, you are at higher risk to develop the disease.
  • Cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking is the most important controllable risk factor for developing Crohn’s disease.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. These include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, and others), naproxen sodium (Aleve), diclofenac sodium (Voltaren) and others.

Eisenhower served two terms in office from January 20, 1953 to January 20, 1961.  He died March 28, 1969.

If you have a family member who has a serious illness and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501.  The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs).  Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee.  American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission.  For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

DIAGNOSIS: RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

Sandra was forty years old when she first noticed that the joints in her hands and toes were tender, warm, and swollen. In the mornings, the joints were stiff, and her body ached. She said she felt like she had been run over by a Mack Truck. She knew something was wrong so she made an appointment with her doctor.

The following week she met with her doctor. Sandra described her current symptoms (pain, stiffness, tenderness, warm and swollen joints). The doctor examined each joint, looking for tenderness, swelling, warmth, and painful or limited motion. He noted that the joints on both sides of her body were affected. (Rheumatoid arthritis tends to affect joints on both sides of the body.)

Next, the doctor ordered blood tests to measure inflammation levels. The blood tests also look for biomarkers such as antibodies (blood proteins) linked with rheumatoid arthritis.

Finally, he ordered a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) to look for joint damage, such as loss of bone within the joint and narrowing of joint space. Note that the lack of joint damage does not rule out rheumatoid arthritis. It may mean that the disease is in an early stage and hasn’t yet damaged the joints.

While she waited for the results of the tests, Sandra researched osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis on her computer. She discovered that osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. According to https://www.everday health.com/rheumatoid-arthritis, it affects over 30 million adults in the United States. It is also known as degenerative arthritis, and it is also called wear-and-tear arthritis. Osteoarthritis typically occurs in older adults.

By contrast, rheumatoid arthritis is an auto-immune, inflammatory, systemic disease. The immune system attacks healthy cells in the body by mistake. This results in inflammation, pain, and swelling in affected body parts. Rheumatoid arthritis typically attacks several joints symmetrically. It may also affect organs such as the heart, lungs, and eyes.

The test results showed that Sandra did indeed have rheumatoid arthritis. What caused this? Doctors don’t know what causes rheumatoid arthritis. However, according to https://www.mayoclinic.org, the following risk factors have been identified:

  • Being female.
  • Your age. Rheumatoid arthritis most commonly begins between the ages of 40 to 60.
  • Family history. If a member of your family has rheumatoid arthritis, you may have an increased risk of getting the disease.
  • Smoking. Cigarette smoking increases your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Environmental exposure. Exposure to asbestos or silica may increase your risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Obesity. People who are overweight or obese appear to be at somewhat higher risk of rheumatoid arthritis, especially women diagnosed with the disease when they were 55 or younger.

If you have a family member who has a serious illness and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

MUHAMMAD ALI’S FIGHT WITH PARKINSON’S

MUHAMMAD ALI AND WIFE LONNIE
WASHINGTON, DC
JUNE 11, 2001

In 1964, a twenty-two-year-old boxer known by his birth name, Cassius Clay, Jr. entered the ring for a match with Sonny Liston, who had been the world heavyweight boxing champion since 1962. Clay had spent the weeks prior to the match trash-talking Liston’s fighting abilities, trying to get inside his opponent’s head. Clay won the fight in a major upset. He then changed his name from Cassius Clay, Jr., which he called his “slave name,” to Muhammad Ali.

Ali described his fighting style as “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. The hands can’t hit what the eye can’t see.” He considered himself “The Greatest.”

In 1966, two years after winning the heavyweight title, he refused to be drafted into the United States military. He gave as reasons his religious beliefs and opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. He was arrested, found guilty of draft evasion, and stripped of his boxing titles. He was sentenced to five years in prison, fined $10,000, and banned from boxing for three years. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned his conviction in 1971.

Ali was provocative and outlandish and arrogant and fearsome. Before his famous “Rumble in the Jungle” match with George Foreman in 1974, Ali continued his pattern of verbal assault. “I wrestled with an alligator, I tussled with a whale, I handcuffed lightning, thrown thunder in jail. I’m a bad man. . . last week I murdered a rock, injured a stone, hospitalized a brick. I’m so mean I make medicine sick.”

Ali retired from boxing in 1981 at age 39. In 1984 at the age of 42, he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Some reports attributed his condition to boxing-related injuries, but both Ali and his physician disputed this.

In 1998, Ali began working with actor Michael J. Fox, who has Parkinson’s disease, to raise awareness and fund research for a cure for Parkinson’s disease. In 2002, they made joint appearances before Congress to push the case. Ali worked with the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s disease to raise awareness and encourage donations for research.

As his condition worsened, he made limited public appearances. He was cared for at his home by members of his family. Muhammed Ali died June 3, 2016 at age 74 after a 32-year battle with Parkinson’s disease.

If you have a family member who has a serious illness and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

RN Private Duty Nurse Needed in Wheaton, IL

pdn Qualifications:
RN (Registered Nurse)

Location:
Wheaton

Description:
P is a 24 year old girl diagnosed with Hereditary and idiopathic neuropathy. She requires G-Tube and TPN Care.

Shifts Available:
Client needs help with over night shifts.

Apply at: www.ahhc-1.com

Home Health Nurse Job Description

General Purpose: Provides quality nursing care to the client according to physician’s orders and in accordance with agency policies and procedures.

Supervision Received: Position reports to and receives supervision from the Team Leader and/or the Nursing Supervisor.

Supervision Executed: None

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

  1. Provides quality and safe nursing care to the client according to physician’s orders; provides nursing care that reflects the client’s healthcare plans; promotes the health, safety, and development of the client.
  2. Implements procedures and treatments accurately and documents these appropriately.
  3. Writes progress notes legibly and completely every two hours at a minimum. Completes and accurately documents thorough assessments every shift and as needed. Assessments will include vital signs, a review of systems, functional status, a review of medication actions and side effects, sensory status, integumentary system, pain and effectiveness of pain management methods
  4. Communicates and cooperates with every team member including teachers, therapist, nursing supervisor, physicians, Durable Medical Equipment Providers (DME), parents/guardians to implement and coordinate an effecting nursing plan of care.
  5. Maintains client equipment per home schedule and documents maintenance on task sheets.
  6. Utilizes equipment and manages supplies in appropriate, safe, and cost effective manner.
  7. Provides a clean, orderly, and safe environment for the client.
  8. Administers medications and treatments according to physician orders, completes documentation legibly, and reports any undesirable effects to doctor and nurse supervisor as needed.
  9. Provides or assists with activities of daily living using standard nursing practices.
  10. Completes interim doctor’s orders, makes changes in nursing plan of care, communicates changes to family and staff, and forwards orders to office within 24 hours.
  11. Reports for duty on time and with dependability using clockwork whenever available.
  12. Promotes teamwork by sharing information and with open communication to solve problems.
  13. Responds promptly to client/family requests; promotes customer satisfaction.
  14. Provides staff development and hands-on training to ensure quality nursing care
  15. Performs all duties within the parameters of the Nurse Practice Act.
  16. Complies with all state, federal, local laws, and American Home Health Corporation’s Policies and Procedures.
  17. Participates in client case conferences and team meetings.
  18. Remains current in clinical knowledge base and skills. Maintains knowledge base by participating in continuing education.
  19. Keeps personnel file complete and up to date.

Peripheral Duties:

1. Participates in special meetings or committees.

Desired Minimum Qualifications:

  1. Education and Experience: Current State of Illinois nursing license as Registered Nurse or Licensed Practical Nurse with at least one year of experience in nursing.
  2. Knowledge and Skills: Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously. Effective time management skills. Ability to utilize critical thinking skills to resolve untoward issues in collaboration with peers, office support and supervisory staff in support of the plan of care.
  3. Special Requirements: Knowledge of approved and non-approved abbreviations used in nursing.
  4. Tools and Equipment: Fax machine, copier, shredder and pen.
  5. Physical Demands: Ability to see, hear, and speak; to sit for long periods of time; to stand, bend, ability to lift up to 50 pounds for private duty and 20 pounds for intermittent.
  6. Work Environment: The noise level is moderate.

While the job description identifies essential functions of the job, if an applicant is disabled and therefore challenged by any of these functions, American Home Health Corporation will provide reasonable accommodations to allow an otherwise qualified applicant to participate in the position of Home Health Nurse.

Acknowledgement

  1. I have reviewed and understand the above job description and believe it to be accurate and complete, and I can successfully fulfill each duty or task. I also agree that management retains the right to change this position description at any time.
  2. I agree to pursue the responsibilities outlined above and to understand that this document will be used as the basis for evaluation once a year.
  3. Requirements are representative of minimum levels of knowledge, skills and/or abilities. To perform this job successfully, the incumbent will possess the abilities or aptitudes to perform each duty proficiently.
  4. This position requires a background check.

Revised 08/22/2014

Apply at: www.ahhc-1.com

 

AN AMAZING DISCOVERY

mastodon

During the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the formation of the Civil Works Administration in 1933. The federal government hired unemployed men to build parks, repair schools, construct athletic fields and swimming pools. Others tutored the illiterate. At its inception, the program employed 2.5 million in a month’s time. At its peak, it employed 4 million. CWA workers earned $15 a week.

One of the projects was the Phillips Park Lake Excavation Project in Aurora, Illinois. During the digging in a boggy area in 1934, the work crew discovered mastodon bones. On March 7, 1934, the work crew uncovered a massive mastodon skull buried in the swampland. The skull weighed 188 pounds.

Other mastodon bones were also recovered. These include a 92-pound lower jaw, a 6-foot-long tusk, ribs, and vertebrae. The bones are estimated to be 10,000 to 20,000 years old. The mastodon bones are currently on display at the Mastodon Gallery at the Phillips Park Visitors Center.

Since the first discovery of mastodon bones in New York in 1705, mastodon bones have been found across the United States. In 1739 bones were found in Kentucky by French soldiers. Some time later, bones were found in South Carolina. Soon after that, bones and tusks were discovered in Ohio. According to https://en.wikipedia.org, fossils range from Alaska and New England in the north, to Florida, southern California, and as far south as Honduras.

The name “mastodon” comes from two Greek words and means “breast tooth.” The French naturalist George Cuvier assigned that name in 1817 because of the nipple-like projections on the crowns of its molars.

Mastodons, which are now extinct, are distantly related to elephants. They lived in herds and ate a mixed diet obtained by browsing and grazing. What is the difference between browsing and grazing? Browsing means the animal feeds on leaves, soft shoots, or fruits of high growing, generally woody, plants such as shrubs. Grazing means the animal feeds on grass or other low vegetation.

In the article “Mastodon” on https://en.wikipedia.org, the author describes the appearance of the mastodon: “The American mastodon resembled a woolly mammoth in appearance, with a thick cost of shaggy hair. It had tusks that sometimes exceeded 5 meters (16 ft.) in length; they curved upwards, but less dramatically than those of the woolly mammoth.” The average body size of a mastodon was around 7 ft. 7 in. in height at the shoulders. However, large males could grow up to 9 ft. 2 in. in height. One mastodon fossil was 10.7 ft. tall.

What caused the mastodon to become extinct between 10,000 and 11,000 years ago? Scientists are not exactly sure why this happened. Paleo-Indians entered the Americas in relatively large numbers 13,000 years ago. Their hunting may have caused a gradual reduction in the numbers of mastodons. Another factor may have been the loss of the mastodon’s habitat due to changing climates.

—By Karen Centowski