Tag Archives: hair

LOCKS OF LOVE

Imagine yourself with no hair. If you’re a man, you probably could adjust to being bald. After all, some men shave their heads as a fashion statement. Musicians and movie stars routinely appear bald. Remember Yul Brynner in the 1951 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, The King and I? How about Michael Jordan, the famous basketball player?

For a woman it’s a different story. Even in Biblical times, a woman’s long hair was considered her glory. It was not her clothing, not her jewelry, not her facial features. It was her long hair. According to an article at http://www.dailymail.co.uk, the average woman in the U.S. will spend over $55,000 on grooming and styling her hair in a lifetime. Hair is important to women.

What if you were a child and had no hair on your head? Would other children make fun of you? Would strangers stare at you?

In 1997, an organization called Locks of Love was founded to provide hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children under age 21 suffering from long-term medical hair loss from any diagnosis. According to www.locksoflove.org, “Most recipients suffer from an autoimmune disorder called alopecia areata, which causes hair follicles to shut down, causing hair loss on the scalp. Many also lose their eye lashes, eyebrows, and all body hair. The hair loss is permanent. Others are victims of severe burns or cancer survivors.”

To make these hairpieces for children, Locks of Love relies on individuals to donate their own hair. Donated hair must be at least ten inches long measured tip to tip. Colored or permed hair is accepted, but hair that has been bleached is not usable. Wigs, falls, hair extensions, or synthetic hair are not accepted.

Locks of Love encourages donors to have their hair cut at their regular beauty shop. Be sure to discuss this plan with your beautician in advance. Ask if the beautician has experience with donations to Locks of Love. Cutting ten inches off your hair is a big step. You want to be sure that you and the beautician follow the guidelines. For more information, go to http://www.locksoflove.org.

If your child has a serious medical condition and needs pediatric private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants(CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com.

—By Karen Centowski


To see a video of Army Captain Cara Manning donating 16 inches of her hair, go to Locks of Love You Tube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TihjqArB8KE.

HAIR TODAY GONE TOMORROW

shaving_head

Hair, the irreverent rock musical of the 1960’s, proclaimed its glory in song: “Gimmie head with hair/long beautiful hair/shining, gleaming/streaming/flaxen, waxen./ Gimmie down to there/Shoulder length or longer.”

A study by the New York Post, reported at http://nypost.com/2017/07/06, revealed that participants reported spending $58 per month on haircuts, hair products, and shaving supplies. That figure was based on spending $34 for a haircut and $15 for hair products. If you have long hair and have gone to a beauty shop recently, you know that figure is much too low. A more realistic figure would be $80 for a color, trim, and set/blow dry plus a 20% tip.

There is no doubt that Americans love their hair. Here is the question. Would you shave your head to raise money to fund research to find a cure for pediatric cancer? Wow! That’s a hard question to answer, especially if you’re a woman. We’re used to seeing men with shaved heads, but it’s different with a woman.

Then there’s the practical consideration. Hair only grows half an inch a month. That’s only six inches in a year. For a woman with long hair, it would take years to regrow that much hair. Besides, even during that time, the hair would need to be trimmed every six to eight weeks to keep the ends from splitting.

Maybe you’ve heard about the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, the top private funder of childhood cancer research grants in the U.S. and around the world. What started as a challenge between three friends in New York City on March 17, 2000 has grown into a charity famous for its head-shaving events. Individuals agree to have their heads shaved for contributions to the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. Currently, 83% of the money raised by the St. Baldrick’s Foundation is through these head-shaving events. According to https://www.stbaldricks.org, “Since 2005, St. Baldrick’s has awarded more than $234 million to support lifesaving research, making the St. Baldrick’s Foundation the largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants.”

People sometimes ask about the name of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. Is there a real St. Baldrick? Apparently not. According to the article at https://www.stbaldricks.org, the name “St. Baldrick’s” is a combination of the words “bald” and “St. Patrick’s” since the first event was held on March 17, 2000, which is St. Patrick’s Day.

The head-shaving events generate the most money and publicity for St. Baldrick’s Day, but corporate sponsors are also very important to the foundation. In addition, donations of goods or services such as office supplies, event T-shirts, advertising space, and printing help keep expenses down. Volunteers are also essential to the success of the foundation.

If your child has cancer and needs pediatric private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com.

—By Karen Centowski


To see a video of a head-shaving event, go to Mackenzie Shaves Her Head for Charity—St. Baldrick’s—March, 2012 YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxB9Inq9Apk.

HAIR TODAY, GONE TOMORROW

Hair Cut

Women’s hair. A woman’s crowning glory. An object of attention. How many hours and dollars have American women spent on their hair in the past fifty years? From the bouffant and beehives of the 1960’s to the long, soft, feminine styles and the Afro of the 1970’s, styles were constantly changing. Do you remember the long, straight hair popularized by the hippie movement of the 1970’s? How about the hair styles influenced by Madonna and Cindy Lauper in the 1980’s? Spiral perms were the newest thing in the 1990’s. Since then women have colored their hair, highlighted their hair, permed their hair, straightened their hair, and more. Each year brings a new fashion twist.

Within this whole litany of women’s hair styles, have I ever mentioned bald? Like no hair? Like a skinhead? Absolutely not. When we see a woman who has no hair, we automatically assume she has cancer. We think that the treatments she is undergoing have caused her hair to fall out. Somehow, we expect women to have hair. We don’t expect women to shave their heads.

A different standard exists for men. First used by the military in World War II, variations of the buzz cut have become popular. These include the crew cut, the flat top, the burr cut, and the brush cut. All of these are short haircuts. For example, the burr cut is the haircut new recruits receive when they join the military. The buzz cut gets its name from the sound the clippers make while the hair is being cut.

For the last ten or fifteen years, shaved heads have become increasingly popular with men. Albert Mannes, PhD. at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted a study called “How Shaved Heads Are Perceived/Shaving A Man’s Head and its Effect on Social Perception.” That is, how does a man’s decision to shave his head affect how he is socially perceived by others? There were several parts to the study.

In Study 1, photographs of twenty-five men in identical dark suits and ties were taken. Ten of the men (five white and five black) had shaved heads. Fifty-nine students viewed the photographs of all twenty-five men and rated them on perceived dominance and agreeableness. Sixty other students rated all twenty-five men on attractiveness and estimated their age. The results were that the men with shaved heads were rated as more dominant. The twenty-five men did not differ significantly in agreeableness, attractiveness, or perceived age.

Study 2 tried to test the Study 1 results. Could the results of Study 1 be explained by saying that more dominant men chose to shave their heads (not that shaving one’s head caused the man to be perceived as more dominant)? Pictures of four men were digitally “shaved” so there were “shaved” and “unshaved” pictures of each man. The shaved men were rated as more dominant, confident, masculine, older, taller, and stronger. The unshaved men were rated as more attractive.

So, if you’re a man, the choice is up to you.

—By Karen Centowski