Tag Archives: cook

A FORMIDABLE FOE: LEWY BODY DEMENTIA

Born at St. Luke’s Hospital in Chicago on July 21, 1951, Robin Williams was the son of Robert Fitzgerald Williams, a senior executive in Ford Motor Company’s Lincoln-Mercury Division. His mother, Laurie McLaurin, was a former model from Jackson, Mississippi. During a television interview on Inside the Actors Studio in 2001, Williams credited his mother as an important early influence on his humor. He said he tried to make her laugh to gain attention.

Williams attended public elementary school at Gorton Elementary School in Lake Forest and middle school at Deer Path Junior High School. When he was twelve, his father was transferred to Detroit. When he was sixteen, his father took early retirement and the family moved to California.

He began performing stand-up comedy in San Francisco and Los Angeles in the 1970’s. He also starred in numerous films including Good Morning, Vietnam (1987) and the box office hit Mrs. Doubtfire (1993).

On August 11, 2014, the world learned that Williams had committed suicide by hanging himself in his California home. He was sixty-three years old. The autopsy report showed no alcohol or illegal drugs were involved. Prescription drugs in his system were at “therapeutic” levels. The final autopsy report noted that Williams had been suffering “a recent increase in paranoia.” An examination of his brain tissue suggested Williams suffered from “diffuse Lewy body dementia.”

According to a Mayo Clinic article “Lewy body dementia” at https://www.mayoclinic.org., “Lewy body dementia, also known as dementia with Lewy bodies, is the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer’s disease dementia. Protein deposits, called Lewy bodies, develop in nerve cells in the brain regions involved in thinking, memory and movement (motor control).

“Lewy body dementia causes a progressive decline in mental abilities. People with Lewy body dementia may experience visual hallucinations, and change in alertness and attention. Other effects include Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms such as rigid muscles, slow movement and tremors.”

If you have a family member who suffers from Lewy body dementia and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs), Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY

Looking down the long hall from her office to the conference room, Elaine must have thought about the number of steps required to get there. Fifty? A hundred? Five hundred? A thousand? Even using the cane only helped a little. At least there were no stairs to climb.

And then there were the problems at home. How much longer would she be able to take her dog, Patrick, for a walk past the school playground where the children were playing hopscotch? Who would pull the weeds out of the flower garden in the front yard? How much longer could she make the beds or wash the dishes? So much of life depends on the ability to stand and walk.

Elaine’s primary care doctor referred her to an orthopedic surgeon. He recommended knee replacement surgery. He explained that nearly one million Americans undergo hip or knee replacement surgeries each year. He said the majority of these procedures were performed on patients over the age of 65. According to https://www.webmd.com/osteoarthritis/guide/knee, “Osteoarthritis is the main reason why people go for knee replacement surgery. The age-related condition is very common and occurs when cartilage—the cushion between the knee and bone joints—breaks down.” Elaine fit into those demographics.

The doctor explained that patients having knee replacements are normally discharged from the hospital three days after surgery. Elaine would need to be able to use a walker before she could be discharged. Then someone would need to be with her at home 24/7 during her recovery.

The doctor told Elaine that the initial short-term recovery stage lasts four to six weeks for most patients. Nurses would need to be with her to tend to her medical needs. Therapists would come to her home to provide physical therapy. The final phase, long-term recovery, could take as long as six months.

Patients need the encouragement of family and friends throughout the whole process of knee replacement surgery. It would be easy to feel alone and to get discouraged. If someone you know is having knee replacement surgery, send a card. Call your friend or family member. Make a gift basket and deliver it. Do something to let them know you care.

If you have a friend or family member who is having knee replacement surgery and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (RNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to our Web site, www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

HOW TO RESTORE A RUSTY IRON SKILLET

If you love to cook, you are probably aware of the resurgence in popularity of cooking with a cast iron skillet or Dutch oven. You may have inherited a cast iron skillet from your grandmother, or you may have seen cast iron skillets at garage sales or estate sales or flea markets. Maybe your son was in Boy Scouts years ago, and his troop used a Dutch oven to cook over a campfire. Instead of buying a new cast iron skillet or Dutch oven, you could restore an old one.

Maybe you think that restoring your rusty cast iron skillet or Dutch oven is too difficult for you to attempt. Maybe you thought the rusty iron skillet you saw at a garage sale or estate sale or flea market was too damaged to be restored. You were wrong! With a few simple items and a little elbow grease, you can make these items as good as new.

To restore a cast iron skillet or Dutch oven, you will need a scouring pad (SOS pad) or fine steel wool, vegetable oil (e.g., Mazola oil), paper towels, warm water, dishwashing soap (e.g., Dawn), a soft towel, a large cookie sheet, aluminum foil, and an oven.

Below are the directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Using a scouring pad or fine steel wool, scrub off rust from pan and lid,
  3. Wash in warm, soapy water.
  4. Dry thoroughly with a soft cloth towel.
  5. Coat inside and outside of pan and lid with vegetable oil (e.g., Mazola oil). Use a paper towel to spread oil around.
  6. Wipe off excess vegetable oil with a clean paper towel.
  7. Put aluminum foil on a cookie sheet and place on the bottom rack of an oven to catch drips.
  8. Place pan, upside down, on top rack of oven. Place lid, right side up, on top rack of oven.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour.
  10. Turn off oven. Let pan and lid cool in oven. Remove pan, lid, and cookie sheet.

Store Dutch oven with a folded paper towel between one side of pan and lid to allow air to circulate.

—By Karen Centowski


To see a video about how to restore a rusty cast iron skillet or Dutch oven, go to How To Restore Rusty Cast Iron Cookware at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg6S6vWyPH8

Easy Home Made Refried Beans Done in a Crock Pot

Refried Beans in Crock Pot

Main Ingredients:

  1. Dry (bagged) Pinto Beans
    Note: Rinse beans and soak in hot water for about 20 minutes.

Other Ingredients:

Put the following in the crockpot:

  1. About 1 —1½tbsp olive oil
  2. Diced onions
  3. Mince Garlic
  4. Cilantro

Directions:

  1. Put the beans in the crockpot with all the other ingredients, add water until it’s about an inch above the beans.
  2. Cook on low for about 6-8 hours.
  3. Once they are done, drain most of the water, then smoosh the beans using a potato smasher.
  4. Season with salt and pepper to your preference.

Note: If you don’t have a crockpot, you can purchase a can of Pinto Beans, while warming it on the stove (with the liquid it comes in), you can still add the olive oil, onion, garlic and cilantro. Once it’s warm,  smoosh the beans.