Tag Archives: Chicago

Pediatric Private Duty Services

Private Duty Nursing consists of a nurse or nurses tending to the child or infant for an entire shift or shifts, usually 6-8 hours per day up to 24 hours per day.

Our company offers a total package of pediatric programs and services designed exclusively for infants, children and adolescents. We work with physicians, family members and the entire healthcare team to develop a comprehensive plan of care addressing the client's goals and expectations. We recognize each client and their family has different needs, and requires a unique approach.

Who can benefit from pediatric home health care? Infants and children with the following conditions:

  • Cardiac abnormalities
  • Apnea
  • Respiratory diagnoses
  • Prematurity
  • Neurological impairment
  • Orthopedic conditions
  • Digestive disorders
  • Birth and congenital defects
  • Infections
  • Recuperating from surgery, burns or accidents
  • Terminal illness
  • American Home Health's personnel are thoroughly versed in administering the most sophisticated therapies in the home:
  • Ventilator Care
  • Oxygen Therapy
  • Tracheostomy Care
  • BiPAP or CPAP
  • Intravenous Therapy
  • Wound Care
  • Ostomy Care
  • TPN – Total Parenteral Nutrition
  • Monitoring Devices
  • Tube Feedings

For more information, please contact American Home Health. Our phone number is 630-236-3501.

Pediatric Home Health Services

This includes registered nurses and therapists providing intermittent visits to instruct family members in the care of the child or infant. They will instruct the client or his family until they are competent with the care. Then on a regular basis they will continue to visit the client to assess progress, reinforce the doctors' plans and assist the client to meet their goals. The frequency of the visits and duration of how long the nurse or therapist continues to visit the client is specific to each case.

  • This type of care could include:
  • Pre or Post Surgical Care
  • Respiratory Diagnosis
  • Cardiac Diagnosis
  • Cancer
  • Transplant
  • Wounds
  • Rehabilitative Services
  • Chronic or Acute IV Therapy
  • Pain Management

Examples of Services:

  • Client and Family Education
  • Assessments
  • Lab Draws
  • Asthma Education
  • Diabetic Education
  • Wound Care
  • Tube Feedings
  • Enterostomal Care
  • Bowel Program
  • Respiratory Nursing Care
  • Infusion Therapy Services

Rehabilitation Services: Serving clients with acute and chronic disabling conditions such as those caused by neurologic, musculoskeletal, congenital and genetic disorders. Services include:

  • Physical Therapy – Home Exercise Program, Gait Training, Transfer Training, Home Safety Evaluation
  • Occupational Therapy – Adaptive Equipment for ADL's, Home Safety
  • Speech Therapy – Swallowing Exercises, Speech and Communication

For more information, please contact American Home Health. Our phone number is 630-236-3501.

Adult Supportive Services

Adult Supportive Services: Serving clients without the need for skilled care when the care of a paraprofessional could mean they can remain in their homes safely and cost effectively.

  • Nurse's Aide – for bathing, grooming, hygiene, transferring, toileting and other personal care needs
  • Companions Care – to help with light housekeeping, meal preparation, errands, transportation, grocery shopping and recreational activities
  • Dementia Care – to provide safety and personal care to clients with moderate to advanced levels of dementia
  • Respite Care for the Family – to provide rest for family caregivers during emergencies or for vacations

For more information, please contact American Home Health. Our phone number is 630-236-3501.

Adult Infusion Nursing Services

Our trained team of dedicated professionals consists of highly qualified individuals to ensure you are receiving the most comprehensive care available in the privacy of your own home. AHHC delivers care with quality, compassion, and reliability.

Here are some of the features of American Home Health Infusion Nursing:

  • Continuity of care. Each client is assigned a nurse to provide all of the client’s care. This ensures the nurse’s familiarity with the client’s condition and care and forms a bond of trust with the client.
  • One Point of Contact for referral, labs, updates, status changes. We make it easy to find the answers.
  • Experienced nurses providing pediatric, transplant, cardiac and specialty care
  • Ability to provide nursing for any type of infusion approved for home health administration
  • We also provide other disciplines: Therapist, Home Health Aides, Private Duty Nursing
  • Specialize in patient education
  • Highly skilled, able to provide care for a variety of infusion devices (central lines, epidural lines or perform peripheral IV starts)
  • Comprehensive assessment of all patients during each phase of treatment
  • Blood draws, monitoring of lab results, reporting of lab results to the infusion team
  • “On Call” RN for client support and after-hours visits
  • Clinical updates provided to physicians and case managers on a regular basis
  • Work with most payor sources
  • Medicare Certified, Joint Commission Accredited, State Licensed

For more information, please contact American Home Health. Our phone number is 630-236-3501.

HEMOPHILIA: “A ROYAL DISEASE”

HEMOPHILIA is a rare blood disorder in which the patient’s blood does not clot normally because it lacks sufficient blood-clotting factors. An inherited disease, it is usually passed from mother to son. Because it was prevalent in European royal families, it is also known as “a royal disease.”

According to https://hemophilianewstoday.com/2017/05/24, it is believed that Victoria, Queen of England, was a carrier of hemophilia and that she passed the disease onto three of her children. Prince Leopold died at age 30 from a post-accident hemorrhage. Princess Alice and Princess Beatrice married royalty in other European countries.

Princess Alice, a hemophilia carrier, had a son who died from the disease in early childhood. One of her daughters, Irene, married Prince Henry of Prussia. She passed the gene to the German royal family. Alice had two sons, one of whom died at age 4. The other son died at age 56.

Alice’s second daughter, Alix, married Tsar Nikolas II of the Russian royal family. Tragically, all of their children were killed during the Russian revolution. The mutant gene ended there.

Princess Beatrice’s daughter, Victoria Eugenie, married King Alfonso XII of Spain. They had five children—one daughter and four sons. The daughter was a carrier of the hemophilia gene, but her children did not inherit the disease. Two of the four sons had hemophilia, but they died without having children.

It is interesting to note how the mutant gene, hemophilia, affected history. Today, hemophilia has affected people from all walks of life including actors, sports legends, and ordinary people. Richard Burton, the British actor and husband of Elizbeth Taylor, had hemophilia. In 1964, he and Elizabeth Taylor set up the Richard Burton Hemophilia Fund. He died in 1984 from a stroke at the age of 58.

Cyclist Barry Haarde is a hemophilia advocate who has cycled across the United States twice to raise awareness for the disease. He was infected with HIV and hepatitis C during a blood transfusion more than thirty years ago. He is the only man with HIV, hepatitis C, and hemophilia to have cycled across the country.

Ryan White was diagnosed with severe hemophilia A at three days old following extensive bleeding after his circumcision. During the 1980’s he contracted AIDS from unscreened blood transfusions, and he inadvertently became the poster boy for AIDS.

If you have a family member who suffers from hemophilia and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission. For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

STIFF-PERSON SYNDROME

When Laura was thirty years old, she began having episodes of muscle stiffness in the trunk of her body and in her limbs. During these episodes, she would also have severe and prolonged muscle spasms in her legs. As a result, she fell several times. She also suffered from anxiety and depression.

Laura made an appointment with her primary care physician. After ordering some initial testing, the doctor referred Laura to a neurologist. Laura also saw physicians in several other fields including allergy and immunology, rheumatology, and orthopedic surgery. Three years later, she was diagnosed with Stiff-Person Syndrome.

Stiff-Person Syndrome, originally called Stiff-Man Syndrome, is a rare disease which affects only one in a million people. The syndrome affects twice as many women as men. According to the Cleveland Clinic article “Stiff-Person Syndrome/Cleveland Clinic” at https://my.cleveland clinic.org/health articles, it is characterized by “muscle stiffness in the trunk and limbs and heightened sensitivity to noise, touch, and emotional distress, which can set off muscle spasms.” Patients may have abnormal posture, such as being hunched over. Muscle spasms and muscle rigidity may cause patients to fall.

Individuals usually start experiencing symptoms between ages thirty and sixty. Because the disease is so rare, getting a diagnosis can take years. According to the Cleveland Clinic article, “One commonly used tool is a blood test to detect the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies. About 60-80% of affected people have antibodies against GAD that can be detected on a blood test. Therefore, the absence of GAD antibodies does not rule out SPS, but the presence of high levels of GAD antibodies in people with symptoms of SPS strongly supports the diagnosis.”

Treatment of Stiff-Person Syndrome focuses on the specific symptoms present in each person. Doctors may prescribe benzodiazepines, diazepam, or baclofen to treat muscle stiffness and spasms. Pain medications and anti-seizure medications may also be effective for some patients. In addition, doctors may prescribe antidepressants to relieve the anxiety and depression associated with Stiff-Person Syndrome.

If you have a family member who suffers from Stiff-Person Syndrome and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501. The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, Winnebago, Ogle, Lee, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, Grundy, Will, and Kankakee. American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission.

For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

—By Karen Centowski

KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR V.S. LEUKEMIA

 

Born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr. in New York on April 16, 1947, this 12 lb. 11 oz. baby grew up to be a 7 ft. 2 in. professional basketball player.  He began his record-breaking basketball accomplishments in high school when he led Jack Donahue’s Power Memorial Academy to three straight New York City Catholic championships, a 71-game winning streak, and a 79-2 overall record.

During his college years at UCLA, he played on the freshman team in 1966 and on the varsity team from 1967 to 1969.  According to Wikipedia, “He was the main contributor to the team’s three-year record of 88 wins and only two losses:  one to the University of Houston in which Alcindor had an eye injury, and the other to crosstown rival USC who played a “stall game.”  In his first game Alcindor scored 56 points, which set a UCLA single-game record.”

During the summer of 1968, Alcindor converted to Sunni Islam.  However, he did not begin publicly using his Arabic name, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, until 1971.

In 1969, Alcindor began his professional career with the Milwaukee Bucks.  He was an instant star, ranking second in the league in scoring (28.8 ppg) and third in rebounding (14.5 rpg).  He was named NBA Rookie of the Year.  The following year, he was named NBA Most Valuable Player.  Throughout his career, he was well known for his “skyhook,” a hook shot in which he bent his entire body like a straw, raised the ball, and released it at the highest point of his arm’s arching motion.

On June 28, 1989, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar announced that he would retire at the end of the season after twenty years in the NBA.

In November of 2009, he announced that he was suffering from a form of leukemia, Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow.  Abdul-Jabbar said that his condition could be managed by taking oral medication daily, seeing his specialist every other month, and having his blood analyzed regularly.

In February of 2011, Abdul-Jabbar announced via Twitter that his leukemia was gone and he was “100% cancer free.”  A few days later, he clarified his misstatement.  “You’re never really cancer-free and I should have known that.” Abdul-Jabbar said.  “My cancer right now is at an absolute minimum.”

If you have a family member who suffers from leukemia and needs private duty nursing, call American Home Health at (630) 236-3501.  The agency can provide round-the-clock nursing care by Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs).  Our service area covers fifteen counties in Northern Illinois including , and Kankakee.  American Home Health is licensed by the State of Illinois and accredited by the Joint Commission.  For further information, go to www.ahhc-1.com, or call (630) 236-3501.

By Karen Centowski