Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency – Word Scramble

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Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency - Word Scramble
Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency – Word Scramble

Mitochondrial complex I deficiency is a shortage (deficiency) of a protein complex called complex I or a loss of its function. Complex I is found in cell structures called mitochondria, which convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use. Complex I is the first of five mitochondrial complexes that carry out a multi-step process called oxidative phosphorylation, through which cells derive much of their energy.

Mitochondrial complex I deficiency can cause a wide variety of signs and symptoms affecting many organs and systems of the body, particularly the nervous system, the heart, and the muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). These signs and symptoms can appear at any time from birth to adulthood.

People with mitochondrial complex I deficiency typically have neurological problems, such as abnormal brain function (encephalopathy), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), intellectual disability, difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), or involuntary movements (dystonia). Affected individuals may have low muscle tone (hypotonia), muscle pain (myalgia), and extreme fatigue in response to physical activity (exercise intolerance). They tend to develop elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, weakness, and rapid breathing. In severe cases, lactic acidosis can be life-threatening.

People with mitochondrial complex I deficiency sometimes have heart, liver, or kidney problems. Vision problems due to abnormal eye movement or breakdown (degeneration) of the nerves that carry signals from the eyes to the brain (optic nerves) can also occur.

Some people with mitochondrial complex I deficiency have groups of signs and symptoms that are classified as a specific syndrome. For example, a condition called Leigh syndrome is most commonly caused by mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Leigh syndrome is characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities (developmental or psychomotor regression) and typically results in death within 2 to 3 years from the onset of symptoms. Another condition that can be caused by mitochondrial complex I deficiency, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, is associated mainly with vision problems due to optic nerve degeneration. These syndromes can also have other causes.

“Source: MedlinePlus, National Library of Medicine.”
https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/mitochondrial-complex-i-deficiency/